Lena Kirchner

Reporter and Writer

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Lindenwood Students Vote at St. Charles Presbyterian Church

The St. Charles Presbyterian Church on 131 Gamble St. in St. Charles, MO served as the polling place closest to Lindenwood University St. Charles campus on Nov. 8.

The St. Charles Presbyterian Church on 131 Gamble St. in St. Charles, MO served as the polling place closest to Lindenwood University St. Charles campus on Nov. 8.

St. Charles Presbyterian Church Polling Place

A few Lindenwood University students took advantage of the close distance of campus to the St. Charles Presbyterian Church and came out between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. to cast their vote.

“It was really fast and easy and they were really nice,” said Andrea Nicholson, a student of LU and first-time voter. “It was a good experience that makes me feel older.”

The church, which is located on 131 Gamble St. in St. Charles, MO, right behind Harmon Hall, is the closest polling place to Lindenwood University St. Charles campus. Voting offcials clearly restricted us from getting closer than 20 feet to the entrance of the polling place, and therefore, no photos and no videos were allowed to be taken inside.

Many voters of all ages found their way through the entrance of the St. Charles Presbyterian Church on election day 2016.

Many voters of all ages found their way through the entrance of the St. Charles Presbyterian Church on election day 2016.

Tyler Moore, another LU student, said that he was both excited and anxious prior to voting his first time. He believed in his candidate, but the election outcome was uncertain.

Besides three millennials, 12 more experienced voters were willing to give a quick interview at the polling place.

“It’s just my duty as a citizen of America to vote,” said Dan Golde, after casting his vote at the Presbyterian church. “I always vote. Every election.”

This year’s voting experience was not any different from the last ones, said Imelda Maurer, one of the more experienced voters. However, she found it just a little harder to fill in the squares instead of punching the ticket like for previous elections.

Most interviewees confirmed that no issues arose at the polling place and no lines formed that early in the day. In fact, voting went very smoothly and voters did not experience any problems at the St. Charles Presbyterian church on Election Day on Nov. 8.

“No line at all and there were no problems,” said Ron Hanson. “Everything was smooth.”

The smooth voting process does not mean that not many people voted at the St. Charles Presbyterian church.

“A lot of people were in there,” said David, who did not want to give his last name. “But they have enough polling places.”

Maurer said after she cast her vote around 10 a.m. she was voter No. 395. In previous years, she was ranked in the low 200s when coming to vote around the same time.

The parking lot of the St. Charles Presbyterian Church was getting crowded as more and more residents came out to cast their vote between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. on election day 2016.

The parking lot of the St. Charles Presbyterian Church was getting crowded as more and more residents came out to cast their vote between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. on election day 2016.

Voting: Right or Privilege?

When asked whether voting is a right or a privilege, most voters answered that voting is a right. Some said that it is both a right and a privilege, and some were certain that voting is mainly a privilege to them.

“It is definitely a right and a privilege, because of the fact that it is our right to vote by law and it is a privilege to get out and vote” said Darrel Moore, who has voted twice before.

Most voters said they gather information about the candidates and their polices on the internet, some voters look at newspapers as well.

So does Maurer, who said “I do [my own research]. I look at [the candidates] history and I go to objective news sites like national public radio or the league of women voters.”

 

The tendency among voters interviewed at the St. Charles Presbyterian church went away from watching and being influenced by political ads. No one expressed a positive opinion on political advertisements.

“Ads no, I tried to stay away from those,” said Tyler Moore. “The ads themselves seem to be biased of course, but I try to have [information] from every point of view.

 

Media Use Habits

I gathered data about the class’ media use habits by creating a survey via google forms and shared the form on Facebook as well in order to gather responses beyond the multiplatform class. Below, I analyzed the data in infographics created with infogr.am and with canva.

Media Use Habits Graph
created with Infogr.am

 

What I found most interesting was how much time the participants spend consuming news on a daily basis and how much time they spent using social media per day. The results are shown below.

The survey also unveiled some other interesting facts that are shown below in the info graphic created with canva.

Infographic created with canva

Infographic created with canva

 

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